SPACES is a research project which was started in September, 2013 and will run up to February 2017. It aims to collaborate with stakeholders living and working at the coast to identify opportunities for coastal ecosystems to contribute more to poor people’s lives and wellbeing. In the video above, Professor Kate Brown introduces the SPACES aims and framework.

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Our Core Objective

To contribute to poverty alleviation by combining scientific research and knowledge, with local expertise and coastal people’s own experiences and knowledge.

Our Activities

SPACES will study how the condition of coral reefs and mangroves, and the ecological dynamics that determine this, affects the ‘flow’ of potentially useful services, how human inputs turn these into benefits and how social processes distribute these benefits to different members of society.

The project will analyse these ‘ecosystem-wellbeing’ chains and compare them across different kinds of ecosystem services in different contexts to understand how ecosystem services are linked to wellbeing and to identify potential policy levers that can enhance how poor people benefit from ecosystem services.

SPACES activities include:

    1. Mangrove activities
    2. Coral reef and fisheries activities
      1. Fish Catch Monitoring
      2. Coral Reef Surveys
      3. Carbonate Budget
    3. well-being activities
    4. Household Survey
    5. Cultural services
    6. Tourism survey
    7. Value Chain Analysis
    8. Scenario workshops
    9. Policy analysis
    10. Impact activities
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Toy models and scenario development with stakeholders

SPACES will use participatory models and scenarios with stakeholders to understand the local social ecological systems in terms of feedback dynamics, trade-offs and opportunities for sustainable poverty alleviation. This part of the project will build on methods developed in a previous ESPA framework grant.

Our collaboration with a range of partners aims to have impacts on the wellbeing of poor inhabitants of the rapidly transforming coastal areas in Mozambique and Kenya.

Schematic of how the different components of the SPACES project will connect. Roman numerals refer to the different activity clusters: mapping ecosystem service - wellbeing chains through the (I) Ecological and (II) Social components; (III) systems-level analysis to compare these chains in different local contexts; and (IV) activities to increase the impact of the SPACES project.

Schematic of how the different components of the SPACES project will connect. Roman numerals refer to the different activity clusters: mapping ecosystem service – wellbeing chains through the (I) Ecological and (II) Social components; (III) systems-level analysis to compare these chains in different local contexts; and (IV) activities to increase the impact of the SPACES project.