Market structure & participation in trade in octopus, mixed reef fish & small pelagics in Kenya and Mozambique: A value chains approach – Andrew Wamukota et al.(2.1 MB)

About

Reef fisheries are important for food and livelihoods of coastal communities in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) region. The degree to which different people can benefit from fisheries depends on the structure of the market. In spite of their critical role in supporting livelihoods, most fisheries research in WIO has focused on the ecological aspects of fish production. little empirical information exists regarding access to and participation in fish trade.
We mapped the structure of value chains of octopus, and mixed reef fish and small pelagics and contrasted their market characteristics including, structure, identity and role of different actors in the chain, volumes,
prices, and commodity differentiation at each node. We also made a preliminary assessment of how market power and value-addition is shared amongst the market chain actors. Our methods were based on observation, key informant interviews (n~100), and a survey of representatives of each node (n~700) at representative coastal sites in Kenya and Mozambique.

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Artisanal fisheries at Pemba Town, Cabo Delgado: Structure, dynamics and contribution of catch for livelihood in a urban environment – Vera Julien et al.(1.8 MB)

About

Artisanal fisheries are a key subsistence activity of coastal populations of East Africa. Significant numbers of local communities depend on artisanal fisheries for food and income. Northern Mozambique is changing rapidly due to oil and gas industry and tourism. This presentation looks at the increased pressure on fisheries, other opportunities for coastal communities, and the notion of exiting fishing.

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IIFET 2016 – Small Scale developing country fish value chain



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Fisheries Value Chains in Northern Mozambique: A comparative analysis across fisheries and sites

About

This working paper synthesizes results from value chain mapping of three types of small-scale fisheries (octopus, small pelagics and mixed reef fish) across four sites in Northern Mozambique (Lalane, Maringhana, Mieze, and Vamizi). Data was collected within the SPACES project, by the SPACES field team in Mozambique from February – April 2015. It draws on information from the site reports from the four sites and outlines the maps of the fisheries value chains in each site. Each value chain is characterized with respect to number and types of actors involved and a comparative analysis is conducted of value chain characteristics and complexity across fisheries and sites.

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What has wellbeing got to do with the price of fish: A focus on fishers’ income might miss opportunities for sustainable poverty alleviation

SPACES research informs a call to consider fisheries benefits to wellbeing beyond income. An income focus can miss non-monetary dimensions of poverty, unequal distributions and whether it is spent and saved to improve people’s quality of life.

By Tim Daw and Ida Gabrielsson

For the past four years, SPACES has conducted research in coastal communities in Kenya and Mozambique. In the south coastal community of Vanga in Kenya, fishermen are less likely to be income poor than their non-fishing neighbours. However, they and their families are as likely as non-fishers to lack basic food, water and sanitation needs. This contradiction begs us to better understand how the wellbeing of poor coastal communities are supported by fisheries and how interventions can improve wellbeing while balancing the pressure on threatened coastal ecosystems.

Delegates discussing the global goal on ocean health in New York this week should carefully consider how fisheries contribute to wellbeing, and […]

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