Report from 1:1 Meetings in Kenya

About

This report summarizes the 1-1 meetings that SPACES team members conducted with 20+ key stakeholders in Kenya. The one on one meetings offered a free atmosphere to share and discuss SPACES Project findings and community dialogue feedback. The stakeholders were able to interrogate the research findings and the feedback from community dialogue and get areas of common interest and also generate ideas for future engagement with communities and with different stakeholders.

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Artisanal fisheries in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique: rural vs urban fishing centers

About

This working paper investigates the relationship between gear, catch and income generated by the fishers in different seasons. SPACES researchers collected data using fish catch surveys at landing sites in Pemba town, Vamizi and Lalane. A standard questionnaire was used to collect the effort and location of the fishery. The fishery shows a wide range in both gears and profitability, and the surveys in conjunction with ecological surveys conducted by other SPACES team members revealed higher catch per unit effort (CPUE) values in Vamizi and Lalane when compared to Pemba, associated with higher fish diversity and fish biomass at Vamizi and Lalane when compared to Pemba. This suggests that the near shore coral reef environment in Pemba is overexploited.

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Fisheries and mangrove pole value chains in Kenya: A comparative analysis across fisheries and sites

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This working paper synthesizes results from value chain mapping of four types of commodities (octopus, small pelagics, mixed reef fish and mangrove pole) across four sites in Coastal Kenya (Jimbo/ Vanga, Tsunza, Kongowea  and Mkwiro/Shimoni). Data was collected within the SPACES project, by the SPACES field team in Kenya from 28th November 2014 to 31st January 2015.  It draws on information from the site reports from the four sites and outlines the maps of the fisheries and mangroves pole value chains in each site. Each value chain is characterized with respect to number and types of actors involved and a comparative analysis is conducted of value chain characteristics and complexity across fisheries and sites.

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Challenges of measuring place attachment in Kenya and Mozambique

Abstract

This working paper investigates place attachment in Kenya and Mozambique. Place attachment can be defined as “the emotional bonds between people and a particular place or environment” (Seamon, 2014, p.11). The SPACES project survey included questions on place attachment in 7 different coastal communities in Kenya and Mozambique. The 2280 surveys that had valid records were used to produce a single quantitative measure of place attachment. We analyzed both countries together and each country as a separate sample (Kenya, n=1638; Mozambique, n=642) because the questions were asked differently for each country. Two methods for generating a place attachment score were applied, one In general, the place attachment value was lower in Mozambique than in Kenya although this could be due to methodological differences in each country. We also explored the distribution of responses across the place attachment index. The majority of the respondents are strongly place attached–i.e. strongly agree with many or all of the statements. Thirty percent of respondents considering the whole data set gave the maximum score to all the scale items. We have tried to operationalize the concept of place attachment as an affective bond, acknowledging that this measurement reflects only one aspect of relationships to place (William, 2014). Two different methods for constructing a numerical score of place attachment were tried and the results were highly correlated. Although the data were highly skewed towards maximum place attachment scores, some evidence exists for differences between the sites. In particular, the most urban Kenyan site (Kongowea) had the least positive median scores.

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Community Dialogue Reports



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