How DO coastal ecosystems support human wellbeing? New SPACES publication on the many mechanisms

A new paper based on SPACES research reports the diverse ways people reported that ecosystem services support different aspects of wellbeing.

The paper discusses these using the capability approach and theory of human needs.  The the diverse mechanisms to contribute to wellbeing can be categorised as money, use or experience. Considering all of these mechanisms can inform the development of interventions that aim to protect or improve flows of benefits to people.

See Kate Brown’s reflections on the paper on her blog:

http://katrinabrown.org/complex-social-factors-mediate-the-links-between-ecosystem-services-wellbeing-and-resilience/

Complete citation:

Chaigneau T, Brown K, Coulthard S, Daw TM, Szaboova L. 2019. Money, use and experience: Identifying the mechanisms through which ecosystem services contribute to wellbeing in coastal Kenya and Mozambique. Ecosystem Services 38:100957.

Link to the paper (open access): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoser.2019.100957

Abstract:

Despite extensive recent research elucidating the complex relationship between ecosystem services and human wellbeing, little work has sought to understand how ecosystem services […]

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SPACES publication: Men and women use, experience and value coastal ecosystem services differently

In this latest publication, Matt Fortnam and coauthors from the SPACES team compiled evidence from across the SPACES datasets to illustrate how people’s engagement with ecosystem services are fundamentally gendered…

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800918301836

See this Stockholm Resilience Centre news item for a summary of the paper:

https://stockholmresilience.org/research/research-news/2019-03-17-ecosystem-services-for-men-ecosystem-services-for-women.html

and in the blog below Kate Brown discusses the paper in the context of the emerging literature on the structures that determine who can benefit from ecosystem services, and how:

http://katrinabrown.org/inequality-and-ecosystem-services-social-structures-and-processes-determining-who-benefits-from-ecosystems-and-how/

Abstract:

This article assesses the extent to which our conceptualisation, understanding and empirical analysis of ecosystem services are inherently gendered; in other words, how they might be biased and unbalanced in terms of their […]

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New Publication: Assessing Basic Human Needs to prevent serious harm

The methodology used to explore whether people meet their basic human needs is presented and discussed in this new paper. The paper proposes this as a way to monitor the impact of conservation actions on people to prevent serious harm.

Chaigneau, T., Coulthard, S., Brown, K., Daw, T.M. and Schulte‐Herbrüggen, B., 2018. Incorporating basic needs to reconcile poverty and ecosystem services. Conservation Biology https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/cobi.13209

See this news item on the Stockholm Resilience Centre website:

https://www.stockholmresilience.org/research/research-news/2019-01-24-biodiversity-vs.-poverty-alleviation-or-can-we-have-both.html

And Kate Brown’s reflections on the paper on her blog:

http://katrinabrown.org/a-basic-needs-approach-to-understanding-conservation-impacts-on-multidimensional-poverty/

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New Publication: Kenyan and Mozambican coral reef ‘carbonate budgets’ contribute to international picture of corals under sea-level rise.

SPACES coral reef surveys have contributed to an international picture of how reefs might be able to grow to keep up with sea-level rise, recently published in Nature.

The growth of coral reefs is strongly influenced by the amount and types of coral living on the reef surface, but across both regions this growth is now being hampered by combinations of coral disease, deteriorating water quality and fishing pressure, along with severe impacts from “coral bleaching” caused by climate change. By counting the organisms responsible for building up and eroding reefs, SPACES team members Chris Perry and Fraser Januchowski-Hartley have been able to calculate the ‘carbonate budget’ and estimate how quickly reefs can grow towards the surface (the ‘accretion rate’).

In the figure below, the Mozambican (17) and Kenyan (18) SPACES sites can be seen in comparison to reefs from around the Indian ocean and Western Atlantic. The poorest reefs in […]

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Value Chain Analysis of Mangrove Forests in Central Mozambique: Uses, Stakeholders and Monetary Chains

About

Vilma Machava’s poster from the 10th WIOMSA symposium, which documents the mangrove value chain in central Mozambique; stakeholder engagement and their current and potential benefits and monetary pathways involved in different stakeholder and related sites.

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